White cockatoo (Cacatua alba) - photo by Amy Evenstad CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0

White cockatoo (Cacatua alba) – photo by Amy Evenstad CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0

Before You Make Travel Plans

You will need to select a Designated Port and apply for and obtain necessary permits and authorizations from the United States and the foreign country prior to firming up your travel plans. The permit application processing time averages 60 days and there is not a means to expedite applications; be sure to plan ahead!

Crossing the United States Border with Your Pet Bird:  Inspections at a Designated Port

All wildlife imported or exported from the U.S. for any purpose must be inspected by a Wildlife Inspector from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement prior to import or export (including species not listed under CITES or WBCA). Wildlife Inspectors are stationed at offices called “Designated Ports” at certain border crossings and airports to perform these inspections by appointment. Review the list of Designated Ports prior to arranging your travel plans or applying for a permit (see http://www.fws.gov/le/ports-contact-information.html). If you are unable to travel through a Designated Port, you may apply for a Designated Port Exception Permit by submitting application form 3-200-2, available from http://www.fws.gov/forms/3-200-2.pdf. A Designated Port Exception Permit authorizes an inspection, by appointment, at another border crossing. When you later apply for a permit to import/export your pet, report the Designated Port you select on your application form, or submit a copy of your Designated Port Exception Permit.

Once you have obtained all necessary permits and authorizations and are ready to travel, contact the Wildlife Inspector at the appropriate Port at least 72 hours in advance to make an appointment for the inspection and clearance of your pet. Complete a Declaration Form 3-177 prior to your appointment (http://www.fws.gov/le/declaration-form-3-177.html). At the appointment you will present your pet, your permits, the Declaration form 3-177, and any other required documentation for inspection. Contact a Wildlife Inspector to discuss questions about this process (see http://www.fws.gov/le/ports-contact-information.html).

United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA – APHIS)

Contact USDA-APHIS to determine their quarantine and health certificate requirements for import and export; visit their website at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wps/portal/aphis/ourfocus/importexport or call the National Import Export Services (NIES) Call Center: 301-851-3300.

CITES/ WBCA/ ESA Permits: What Type of Permit Do I Need, and How Do I Apply? 

The Service issued regulations implementing CITES, the WBCA, and the ESA that provide for permits to allow the export and/or import of certain pet birds. The Service’s Division of Management Authority, Branch of Permits processes applications for several different permit types, depending on the activity. The Branch of Permits will review a complete application to ensure your pet and the proposed activity meets the criteria for a permit. The Branch of Permits may issue one permit document with multiple authorizations under more than one law if your pet is listed under both CITES and WBCA. Permit application processing time averages 60 days. There is not a means to expedite applications, so be sure to plan ahead.

Review the permit types below; if you are unsure about what permit type applies to your pet bird or your activities, contact the Service’s Division of Management Authority, Branch of Permits, at managementauthority@fws.gov or 1-800-358-2104.

WBCA/ CITES Single Use Import Permit:  This permit type authorizes a single border crossing into the United States under the WBCA (and CITES for Appendix I species) and remains valid for one year. It is appropriate if you are moving your household into the United States or are visiting the United States for a single trip.

The WBCA restricts the import of listed species, which may only be imported as a personally owned pet of an individual who is returning to the United States after being continuously out of the country for a minimum of one year. An individual may not import more than 2 birds in any year. If you meet these criteria, obtain a CITES Export permit from the foreign country, then submit application form 3-200-46 (available from http://www.fws.gov/forms/3-200-46.pdf) and the processing fee to the Service (instructions are available on the application form). You may apply for up to two pet birds in one year (both birds may be listed on the same application). Review the application form to determine what information the Service needs to make a permit issuance determination.

CITES/ WBCA Single Use Export Permit:  This permit type authorizes a single border crossing out of the United States under CITES and also includes a re-import authorization under the WBCA. The one-time CITES authorization remains valid for six months, but as long as you maintain a copy of the cleared permit the one-time WBCA re-import authorization will not expire and may be used at a later date. This permit type is appropriate if you are moving your household out of the United States or are taking a single trip out of the United States. You may apply for multiple birds on the same application. There are no restrictions on the length of time you may travel abroad or on the number of birds you may take with you.

Submit application form 3-200-46 (available from http://www.fws.gov/forms/3-200-46.pdf) and the processing fee to the Service (instructions are available on the application form). Review the application form to determine what information the Service needs to make a permit issuance determination. If your pet bird is listed under CITES Appendix I, you will first need to obtain a CITES import permit from the foreign country.

CITES/ WBCA Pet Passport:  This permit type is for U.S. Residents and authorizes multiple border crossings out of and back into the United States under CITES and the WBCA; it remains valid for three years. The pet passport is appropriate for individuals that intend to travel frequently from the United States with their pet bird, such as to and from Canada.

Submit application 3-200-64 (available from http://www.fws.gov/forms/3-200-64.pdf) and the processing fee to the Service (instructions are available on the form). Only one bird may be listed on a pet passport; submit a separate application for each pet bird. Review the application form to determine what information the Service needs to make a permit issuance determination.

WBCA/ CITES 3 Year Multiple Use Import Permit:  This permit type is for residents of foreign countries who have a pet passport from their home country and authorizes multiple imports under the WBCA (and CITES for Appendix I species).
Submit application form 3-200-46 (available from http://www.fws.gov/forms/3-200-46.pdf) and the processing fee to the Service (instructions are available on the application form). Under the WBCA, an individual can only import two birds per year; you may apply for up to two birds on one application. Review the application form to determine what information the Service needs to make a permit issuance determination. You will first need to obtain a CITES pet passport from the foreign country and submit a copy of the passport with your application.

ESA Listed Species:  Additional restrictions may apply for endangered or threatened species. For details on allowable activities with species listed under the Endangered Species Act, visit the Endangered Species Program’s parrot FAQ page: http://www.fws.gov/endangered/what-we-do/pdf/FAQs_Listed_Parrots_06242014_FINAL.pdf

Foreign Country Requirements
Be sure to check with the countries you are traveling to for their requirements. Import or export permits may be required under CITES, and other countries also have domestic laws and quarantine requirements for the import and export of protected wildlife. Contact information for foreign country CITES Offices is available at the CITES website:  http://www.cites.org/eng/cms/index.php/component/cp.

Entering the United States with your Pet Bird after Living Abroad:  Reminders

If your pet bird was acquired outside the United States and you have resided outside the United States constantly for 1 year, you may import a maximum of two pet birds per person, per year. To ensure that you will be allowed to bring your pet bird into the United States, remember to take the following steps prior to firming up your travel plans (see above for details):

  1. Obtain documented evidence that you have resided outside the United States continuously for a minimum of 1 year.
  2. Obtain documented evidence that each bird was acquired legally.
  3. Select a Designated Port for wildlife import/ export (or if not using a Designated Port, submit application form 3-200-2 to apply for a Designated Port Exception); you will report this on permit application forms and this may influence your travel plans.
  4. Apply for CITES permits or other authorizations from the foreign country.
  5. Apply for a permit from the Service’s Division of Management Authority, Branch of Permits. Instructions are on the application form. Applications must be received at least 60 days in advance of anticipated travel.
  6. Discuss import/ export requirements with USDA- APHIS.
  7. Complete a Declaration Form 3-177 and arrange a clearance inspection at a Designated Port at least 72 hours prior to your anticipated travel. At the clearance appointment, have your CITES/ WBCA permit(s) validated by a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife Inspector. Ask for copies of cleared and validated documentation, and keep them in a permanent file. Copies of documentation will be required if you wish apply for a permit to travel with your pet in the future.

Leaving the United States with Your Pet Bird:  Reminders

To ensure that you will be allowed to bring your pet bird back into the United States from travel abroad, remember to take the following steps prior to firming up your travel plans (see above for details):

  1. Obtain documented evidence that each bird was acquired legally.
  2. Select a Designated Port for wildlife import/ export (or if not using a Designated Port, submit application form 3-200-2 to apply for a Designated Port Exception); you will report this on permit application forms and this may influence your travel plans.
  3. Apply for CITES permits or other authorizations from the foreign country.
  4. Apply for a permit from the Division of Management Authority, Branch of Permits. Instructions are on the application form. Applications must be received at least 60 days in advance of anticipated travel.
  5. Discuss import/ export requirements with USDA- APHIS.
  6. Complete a Declaration Form 3-177 and arrange a clearance inspection at a Designated Port at least 72 hours prior to your anticipated travel. At the clearance appointment, have your CITES/ WBCA permit(s) validated by a Wildlife Inspector before you leave the United States. Ask for copies of cleared and validated documentation, and keep them in a permanent file. Copies of documentation will be required if you wish apply for a permit to travel with your pet in the future.
  7. Take a copy of your validated permit with you. The CITES Export permit may include a WBCA re-imort authorization. This copy must be presented when you re-enter the United States with your pet.

Approved (WBCA Import Authorization Exempt) Captive-Bred Species (listed at 50 CFR 15.33)

Note: The WBCA restricts the number of pet birds individuals may import into the United States annually.  However, if your bird is one of the approved captive-bred species found in the chart here, you do not need a WBCA permit to import your pet (CITES and ESA permit requirements still apply).

Applications and Additional Information

Permit applications (Form 3-200) and any other information you may need are available from the Division of Management Authority, Branch of Permits website http://www.fws.gov/international/permits/. Contact the Branch of Permits with questions at 1-800-358-2104/ Fax 703.358.2281 or managementauthority@fws.gov.

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Source: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – International Affairs Program

 

Transportation Safety Administration (TSA) security procedures do not prohibit you from bringing a pet on your flight. You should contact your airline or travel agent, however, before arriving at the airport to determine your airline’s policy on traveling with pets.

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Documentation

  • No special documentation is required for traveling with a pet.

Security Screening

  • You will need to present the animal to the Security Officers at the checkpoint.
  • Remove all animals from their carrying cases and send the case through the X-ray machine.
  • You may walk your animal through the metal detector with you. If this is not possible, your animal will have to undergo a secondary screening, including a visual and physical inspection by our Security Officers.
  • Your animal will NEVER be placed through an X-ray machine. However, you may be asked to remove your animal from its carrier so that the carrier can be placed on the X-Ray machine.

Travelers with Disabilities and Medical Conditions

General

  • If you have a service animal, you are encouraged to inform the Security Officer that the animal accompanying you is a service animal and not a pet. This will provide you with an opportunity to move to the front of the screening line since the Security Officer may need to spend more time with you.
  • It is recommended that persons using an animal for assistance carry appropriate identification. Identification may include: cards or documentation, presence of a harness or markings on the harness, or other credible assurance of the passenger using the animal for their disability.
  • At no time during the screening process will you be required to be separated from your service animal.
  • Security Officers have been trained not to communicate, distract, interact, play, feed, or pet service animals.
  • The Security Officer should ask permission before touching your service animal or its belongings.You must assist with the inspection process by controlling the service animal while the Security Officer conducts the inspection. You are required to maintain control of the animal in a manner that ensures the animal cannot harm the Security Officer.
  • If you need to leave the secure boarding area to relieve your animal, you must undergo the full screening process again. Inform the Security Officer upon your return to the security checkpoint and she/him will move you to the front of the screening line to expedite the screening process.

Service Dogs

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  • Advise the Security Officer how you and your dog can best achieve screening when going through the metal detector as a team (i.e., whether walking together or with the service dog walking in front of or behind you).
  • If the walk through metal detector alarms in the situation where you and your service dog have walked together, both you and the dog must undergo additional screening.
  • If the walk through metal detector alarms on either you or your service dog individually (because you walked through separately), additional screening must be conducted on whoever alarmed the walk through metal detector.
  • If your service dog alarms the walk through metal detector, the Security Officer will ask your permission and assistance before they touch you service dog and its belongings. The Security Officer will then perform a physical inspection of your dog and its belongings (collar, harness, leash, backpack, vest, etc.) The belongings will not be removed from your dog at any time.

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Source: Transportation Safety Administration (TSA)

 

101 and Mac

Red Roof Inn® is unleashing a SPOTlight on Pet Travel Sweepstakes in celebration of Disney’s 101 Dalmatians Diamond Edition release. Available for the first time on Blu-ray™, Digital HD, and Disney Movies Anywhere. The 30-day sweepstakes started on February 1 and is accessible through various Red Roof® social channels and online at spotredroof.com. From there, entrants will enter their name and email address for a chance to win the Grand Prize of 10 free nights at any Red Roof nationwide and Disney’s 101 Dalmatians Diamond Edition Blu-ray Combo Pack (Blu-ray + DVD + Digital HD). One First Prize winner will receive a $250 Pet Store Gift Card and 30 Second Prize winners will receive a copy of Disney’s 101 Dalmatians Diamond Edition Blu-ray Combo Pack (Blu-ray + DVD + Digital HD). Red Roof will also provide pet owners a platform to share pictures of their pets through Red Roof social channels and online.

“This is our second strategic partnership with Walt Disney Studios and it is one that benefits each of our core audiences in the best way possible,” says Red Roof Chief Marketing Officer, Marina MacDonald. “As a nationally known pet friendly brand, the SPOTlight on Pet Travel promotion is a natural one for us with great prizing for the lucky winners.”

For guests traveling with their furry best friends, Red Roof is offering a National Pet Discount during the month of February. Visitors to the contest site (spotredroof.com) will be able to scratch a SPOT to receive a pet travel discount code. (Blackout dates apply. Subject to availability. Cannot be used with any other discount.) 

In addition, Red Roof Inn properties will randomly place one stuffed Dalmatian in 101 guest rooms as gifts to their guests throughout the month of February. There will be a card asking guests to take a picture with their stuffed Dalmatian and post to social media outlets using the hashtag #spotredroof.

Released in 1961, “One Hundred and One Dalmatians” is one of Disney’s most beloved animated films. The film will be released for the first time ever on Blu-ray as part of Disney’s Diamond Collection and will also be making its Digital HD and Disney Movies Anywhere debut this February 10th. This film is rated G.

The SPOTlight on Pet Travel Sweepstakes and National Pet Discount runs from February 1 – 28, 2015. Winners will be selected randomly at the end of the sweepstakes. To enter log on to spotredroof.com or get social at redroof.com.

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About Red Roof®

Red Roof is a leader in the economy lodging industry with franchised, corporate-managed, and corporate-owned properties, serving millions of guests each year. With coast-to-coast locations, Red Roof has nearly 400 properties in the U.S. The primary goal at Red Roof is to provide customers a savings without sacrificing comfort. The brand recently completed a $200 million investment to renovate and upgrade hotels nationwide with sleek and modern NextGen® redesign elements. The Red Roof NextGen hotels feature updated, stylish and home-like interior and exterior designs that demonstrate the Red Roof dedication to providing customers with an affordable stay in a clean, comfortable and modern room. The company is rolling out Red Roof PLUS+®, an enhanced offering at a value price, committed to “Adding More Wow to Your Stay!®”. Nice Place. Nice Price® is what every consumer can expect when they stay at any Red Roof location; and because the company has a single brand in their portfolio, Red Roof also offers franchisees One Brand. One Focus™. The Red Roof loyalty program, RediCard®, is the richest in the industry rewarding members with free nights with only 6,000 points, advance notice of special offers, and complimentary bottled water each day of their stay. Traveling with your pet? Don’t forget that at Red Roof ‘you stay happy, pets stay free’ as one well-behaved pet is welcome per room, nationwide. The Columbus, Ohio based company has more than 4,500 employees. For more information or reservations, call 800.RED.ROOF (800.733.7663) or visit www.redroof.com.

 

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Traveling with a pet isn’t complicated once you know the rules and requirements. A great resource is the new Globetrotter’s Pet Travel Guide from the pet and vet experts at Petplan Pet Insurance. It’s a concise and easy to read guide that’s useful for both first time and seasoned travelers with furry companions.

Need to leave your pet behind when traveling? No problem! While many folks prefer traveling with their pets, sometimes taking a pet is simply not an option. The Globetrotter’s Pet Travel Guide provides tips and checklists for those leaving a pet in the care of a sitter, boarding kennel, or a veterinarian.

The topics covered in the Globetrotter’s Pet Travel Guide:

Road or Rail Travel

• Before You Embark

- Is Your Pet the Best Co-Pilot?

- Visit the Vet

• Seat Belts & Harnesses

• Public Transportation

- Riding the Rails

- Pets on the Bus or Subway

• Motion Sickness

- Acclimating Your Pet to the Car

• Pet-Friendly Hotels

Air Travel

• Before You Take Flight

- Is Your Pet Ready to Take Wing?

• Vet Before You Jet

- Proper Documentation

- Rabies + Quarantine

- Flying With Snub-Nosed Pets

• Pet-Friendly Airlines

- Question for Airlines

- Flying in Cargo

Pet Sitters

• Why Hire a Pet Sitter

- Highs and Lows of Pet Sitting

• Finding the Right Pet Sitter

- Questions to Ask

- First Visit at the (Dog)House

• Before You Take Off

• At-Home Sitters

Prepping Your Pet for the Sleepover

Boarding Kennels

• Why Choose a Kennel?

• Finding the Right Fit

- Your Pet’s Itinerary

- Facilities

- Emergencies

• Privacy + Pup-Grades

• Avoiding Illness

• Forget That Doggone Guilt

Vet Boarding

• Vet Your Options

• Know Before You Go

- Boarding Requirements

- Exploring the Facilities

• Pup the Question

• Preparing Your Pet

 

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Changes to the pet travel scheme came into effect on December 29, 2014. The following guidance comes from GOV.UK.The guidance explains what’s changed and why.

The changes are mainly designed to strengthen enforcement across the EU, increase levels of compliance and improve the security and traceability of the pet passport.

The changes give effect to a new EU pet travel Regulation (576/2013).

If you already have a passport for your pets, you do not need to get a new one.

The Pet Travel Scheme

The main requirements of the scheme will stay the same. All dogs, cats and ferrets travelling with their owner will still require:

  • microchipping
  • vaccination against rabies
  • a blood test 30 days after vaccination (if returning or travelling from an unlisted third country)
  • a pet passport issued by an authorised vet (or third country certificate issued by an official vet)
  • a waiting period after primary vaccination and prior to travel:
    o 21 days if travelling from another EU country or a listed third country
  • a waiting period following blood sampling
    o 3 months if traveling from for unlisted third countries
    treatment against the EM tapeworm (dogs only)

There are exceptions to some of these preparations in certain circumstances. If you are planning to travel with your pet you must read the detailed guidance at: www.gov.uk/pet-travel-information-for-pet-owners

What’s Changing and What You Have to Do

The key changes affecting pet owners are outlined below:

1. A new pet passport
A new style pet passport will be introduced from 29 December 2014.
However if you already have a passport for your pet you do not need to get a new one. Existing passports will remain valid for the lifetime of the pet (or until all the treatment spaces are filled).

The new style passport will include laminated strips designed to cover those pages with the pet’s details, microchip information and each rabies vaccination entry. This will help prevent anyone tampering with this information once it has been completed by a vet.
The vet issuing the pet passport will also need to fill in their details on a new ‘Issuing of the passport’ page and must make sure that all their contact details are included when they certify vaccinations and treatments.

The UK pet passport will also now include a unique passport number printed on every page .
These changes will improve the traceability and security of the pet passport and enable us to contact the vet who issued the passport if anything goes wrong.

2. The introduction of checks across the EU
If you travel with your pet in the EU you may be asked for your pet’s passport when entering other countries. This is because all EU countries are required to carry out some checks on pet movements within the EU.

You must make sure that your pet is fully compliant with the rules of the EU pet travel scheme before you leave the UK. In particular, you must wait 21 days from the date of your pet’s primary rabies vaccination before you travel (the day of vaccination counts as day 0 not day 1). Your vet can advise you on this point. If you have a new style pet passport they will put a ‘valid from’ date in the primary vaccination entry; this will be the earliest date you can travel.

All pets entering Britain on approved routes will continue to be checked by the carriers either prior to boarding (for rail or sea) or upon entry (air).

3. A new minimum age for rabies vaccination
From 29 December 2014 your pet must be at least 12 weeks old before you can get it vaccinated against rabies for the purposes of pet travel.

These rules will be the same across the EU and help pet checkers carry out compliance checks. It will also prevent very young pets being moved across the EU.

4. New rules for those travelling with more than five pets
If you have more than five pets and wish to travel with them within the EU and/or return to the UK (unless you are going to a show or competition) you will need to comply with additional rules. These include:

• traveling from a registered premises
• using an authorised transporter and
• registering the movement on the TRACES system

If you are traveling from outside the EU you will also need to enter through a Border Inspection Post.

Shows and competitions
If you are travelling with more than five pets (aged over six months) and can present written evidence that they are registered to attend a show, competition or sporting event (or training for such an event) you do not need to comply with these extra rules and can continue to travel under the EU pet travel scheme.

The evidence you provide will need to show at least the name of the event, together with the address and date(s) it is taking place. You may also be asked to sign a declaration confirming that you are eligible to make use of this exemption. This requirement may change – we’re consulting on some of these details – so you should check the website for up to date information before you travel.

5. Requirements for pets entering the UK/EU
If you are entering the UK (or another EU country) and your journey began outside the EU you must sign a declaration confirming that you do not intend to sell or transfer ownership of your pet. The format of this declaration is outlined in Part 3 of Annex IV to Regulation 577/2013..
If you are not able to accompany your pet then you (or a person you have authorised in writing) must travel within 5 days of your pet’s movement. This rule applies both to travel within the EU and for movements from outside the EU.

6. Clearer definition of cat, dog and ferret
The new EU Regulation specifically states that the only species of pet animal that can travel under the EU pet travel rules are:

• Canis lupis familiaris – domestic dog
• Felis silvestris catus – domestic cat
• Mustela putorius furo – ferret

The reason for this change is to make sure that wild animals can’t be moved under rules designed for pet travel.

This change will not affect the majority of pet owners. However, if your pet is a hybrid (such as a Bengal or Savannah cat, or a Wolfdog) then you must seek advice from the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency before you travel. They will advise you on the import requirements for your pet. See ‘Contact us’ below.

Don’t forget…

• Your pet must receive the correct treatments in the correct order. In particular, your pet must have been microchipped before it receives its rabies vaccination. If your pet was vaccinated before being microchipped then it will need to be re-vaccinated after the microchip is inserted.

• If you take your pet abroad it may be exposed to diseases which we do not have in the UK. We recommend you consult your vet about your pet’s health and fitness to travel before you take it abroad. Ask your vet for advice on the appropriate treatments for the part of the world you are travelling to.

• The pet travel rules apply to all dogs, cats and ferrets travelling with their owners (including assistance and guide dogs). You are responsible for ensuring your pet meets all the rules for entering the UK under the pet travel scheme. Make sure you have had the procedures carried out in the correct order and that your pet’s documentation is correctly completed. If you do not, your pet may not be able to enter the country or may have to be quarantined on arrival. This will mean delay and cost you money.

• If you are bringing a dog, cat or ferret into the UK in order to sell it or pass it to a new owner (e.g. for rehoming), you cannot travel under the pet travel scheme. Instead you must comply with the rules of the Balai Directive. Further information is available: www.defra.gov.uk/animal-trade/imports-non-eu/iins/live-animals/iins-other-animals- balai/iin-bllv-5/

Stringent penalties are in place for those that break the pet travel rules in order to bring animals into the UK illegally. Pets that are non-compliant pose a potentially serious risk to both animal and human health. Anyone with information relating to illegal activity should contact their local Trading Standards office.

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Source: GOV.UK is the best place to find government services and information. Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v2.0.

 

Curious cat
There are plenty of dog-friendly hotels, but is the welcome mat extended to cats? Yes! Pet expert Sandy Robins provides a list of cat-friendly hotel chains on Catster.com. It’s important to note hotel policies regarding your feline companion. Tips for booking and information on additional pet fees are included in the article at http://www.catster.com/lifestyle/cat-pet-friendly-hotels-holiday-travel-tips.

Need to find a dog-friendly hotel in a jiffy? Dogster.com has a list of the leading hotel and motel chains at http://www.dogster.com/lifestyle/dog-friendly-hotels-pet-policies-motels-holiday-travel.

 

CBC News: Marketplace interviews Lindsey Wolko from the Center For Pet Safety.

 

CBC News: Marketplace investigated dog safety harnesses, even going so far as crash-testing. There’s graphic footage of several harnesses that failed.With help from Center For Pet Safety‘s crash test dogs, 16 harnesses have been independently tested.Only ONE BRAND PROTECTED PET & PASSENGER: Sleepypod.

 

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With The Original Cat Fancy Cat Bible, award-winning pet expert Sandy Robins and her authoritative team have compiled a 544-page reference book with more than 500 full-color photos that is THE definitive source for all things cat. Period.

Its utility begins with the history of cats, breed characteristics, and necessary considerations to help determine if a cat is right for you, and then continues as a go-to resource through the lifespan of a cat with topics that include bringing your cat home, establishing a healthcare regimen, lifecycle needs, and emergency situations.

The chapter on traveling with your cat helps sort the planning process and navigate the many details to consider such as airport pet potty areas, airline reservations, pet passport and documentation, to tranquilize or not to tranquilize, frequent flyer programs for pets, and checking into a hotel.

The Original Cat Fancy Cat Bible is an essential reference for cat owners, those thinking of adopting a cat, and cat fanciers. It is available on Amazon.com. (Pet Travel Experts)

The Original Cat Fancy Cat Bible

Following the best-selling The Original Dog Bible and The Original Horse Bible comes the long-awaited feline blockbuster, The Original Cat Bible from the award-winning editors of Cat Fancy magazine. The collaborative effort of four of the most respected experts in the cat world, this definitive feline reference book is a must-have for all cat lovers.

Sandy Robins and her team of authors have put forth the most comprehensive, up-to-date, and entertaining volume imaginable. Beginning with a lively history of the cat—from idols in ancient Egypt and mousers on the Mayflower to 21st-century DNA revelations and cats on the Web—The Original Cat Fancy Cat Bible investigates felines in our homes and popular culture, our art, music, and literature, and our folklore and religions.

Cat owners will welcome the abundance of information on purchasing a kitten, cat-proofing and safety for the home, basic care, grooming and feeding, traveling, first aid, lost cat recovery, and so much more.

Following a discussion of the genetics and development of purebred cats, the book presents an extensive breed section, featuring every recognized cat breed in the world—over 60 breeds—as well as another 30 experimental and extinct breeds, written by breed specialists Lorraine M. Shelton and Sarah Hartwell. All breeds are described according to place of origin, history, physical conformation, colors/varieties, temperament, variations, activity level, vocal level, and special needs.

The extensive health section of the book, written by cat veterinary expert Dr. Arnold Plotnick, discusses all of the major disorders and diseases of the cat, categorized by anatomical system.

Special features of this extensive volume include: 

• 60 recognized cat breeds described and illustrated in color

• Training section, featuring positive methods and clicker training, as well as understanding behavior and body language

• Solving common feline problems, including litter-box messes, marking, scratching, aggression, separation anxiety, and more

• Health section, including information on vaccinations, parasites, and major diseases and concerns (diabetes, allergies, kidney disease, asthma, and cancer)

• Feline anatomy: understanding the five body types as well as various coat types, colors, and patterns

• Care information for all cats: kittens, adults, pregnant queens, and seniors

• Activities for cats and their people: indoor toys and games, cat agility, and showing

• Careers with cats, geared toward readers wishing to explore working as a veterinarian or vet tech, chiropractor, behaviorist, groomer, massage therapist, shelter attendant, cat trainer, photographer, and more

• Animal-welfare organizations and rescue

• Extensive glossaries, including show and breed standard terms, medical terms, grooming tools, and activities

This colorful celebration of the cat will be irresistible to all cat lovers who want to expand their understanding of their best feline pals, a perfect encyclopedia for the whole family to enjoy for years to come.

About the authors:

Sandy Robins is an awarding-winning multimedia pet-lifestyle expert, author, TV and radio personality, and pet industry spokesperson. She was the 2013 recipient of the Excellence in Journalism and Outstanding Contributions to the Pet Industry Award presented by the American Pet Products Association. Her two cat books, Fabulous Felines: Health and Beauty Secrets for the Pampered Cat and For The Love of Cats, have both won awards from the Cat Writers Association of America, of which she is a longtime member. She is also a member of the Dog Writers Association of America and received more than 30 awards of excellence from both these organizations for her contributions to the pet world. She lives in Irvine, Calif.

Arnold Plotnick, MS, DVM, aCViM, is the founder of Manhattan Cat Specialists (MCS), a cats-only veterinary facility on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. A graduate of the University of Florida’s College of Veterinary Medicine and the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine, Dr. Plotnick served as the vice president of the prestigious ASPCA Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital before founding MCS. He contributes the Ask the Vet column for Cat Fancy magazine and also writes for Catnip magazine, catchannel.com, and Petocracy.com. He lives in New York City.

Sarah Hartwell, the originator of the messybeast.com website, is a writer on various feline-related topics, including breed history, behavior, rescue, senior cats, and care. Her articles have appeared in Cat Fancy, Cat World, The Cat, Fab, and other magazines and newsletters around the world. Sarah lives in Essex, England.

Lorraine M. Shelton is a research scientist, an author, a cat show judge for The International Cat Association (TICA), and a lecturer in the fields of avian and feline genetics. For two decades, her Featherland Cattery has specialized in rare-colored Persians, Turkish Angoras, Selkirk Rex, and Norwegian Forest Cats. She is the co-author of Robinson’s Genetics for Cat Breeders & Veterinarians. She is a regular contributor to Cat Fancy, catchannel.com, and fanciers.com. She lives in Corona, Calif.

 

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AAA Travel projects 46.3 million Americans will journey 50 miles or more from home during the Thanksgiving weekend, the highest volume for the holiday since 2007 and a 4.2 percent increase over 2013. Almost 90 percent of travelers (41.3 million) will celebrate the holiday with a road trip and likely will enjoy the lowest Thanksgiving gas prices in five years.

So if you are traveling with your pet, this means a little extra preparation (and patience) is necessary to brave the roads, rails, and sky.

If you are traveling with your pet for the first time, pet travel and safety expert Melanie Monteiro offers tips and tricks for making trips with pets a safer and less stressful experience in this brief video.

Don’t forget:

  • Extra food, treats, and water
  • Pet first aid kit
  • Make sure your pet’s vaccinations are up-to-date
  • A photo of you and your pet in case your pet is lost while traveling
  • A travel i.d. tag with the address of your destination

Safe travels!